A Look at Ali Tajvidi’s Manifold Musical Activities (II)

Translated by Mahboube Khalvati
Tajvidi, the “Arranger”
Tajvidi thought of studying harmony and orchestration with Houshang Ostvar (who was eight years younger than him) at a time when he had gained a reputation among musicians. His humbleness, making him willing to kneel before the scholars at any age and position, became the key to his scientific success. After this period, Tajvidi made some of his works polyphonic, the most prominent of which is “Burn” set to a poem by Abdullah Ulfat. However, his ability to make his works polyphonic was not so great to make him self-sufficient; so he depended on musicians such as Farhad Fakhreddini, Fereydoun Naseri, Kambiz Roshanravan, Fereydoun Shahbazian and Morteza Hananeh for the arrangement of his compositions.

Tajvidi, the Master of Radif
Ali Tajvidi also published a Radif the publication of which coincided with the prominence of Mirza Abdullah’s Radif which unfortunately led to the negligence of the former; however, some of his pupils such as Farhad Fakhredini who are familiar with the useful points of this Radif value it greatly.

Tajvidi, the Instructor
Although in the public eye, Ali Tajvidi’s most important pupils are some popular female singers, Tajvidi has been teaching music for many years in the National Conservatory of Music and elsewhere, and many of today’s musicians are Tajvidi’s old pupils. Teaching Persian violin, Tajvidi paid special attention to the techniques of playing classical violin and tried to educate students technically as much as possible; as he himself had benefited from the teachings of Maestros Malik Ebrahimian and Babgen Tembrazian.

Tajvidi, the Setar Player
Apart from being familiar with the violin, Ali Tajvidi was also familiar with the Setar, Tar, Kamancheh, Tonbak and the Flute; however, available recordings show that excluding the violin, he only played the Setar in a standard and professional manner. Tajvidi actually started playing the Setar on the advice of Maestro Abolhassan Saba, and under his supervision.

Final Words
The Iranian style of playing the violin was severely censured after the Islamic Revolution of 1979 and artists such as Ali Tajvidi were also affected by this attitude. Was it not for Tajvidi’s quitting working after the Revolution, this unique Maestro could have created more valuable pieces for the Iranian music scene.
This article was originally published in the Persian language Etemad Newspaper on 15 November 2020.

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The Structure of Kurdistan Daf (IV)

Researcher: Mohammad Tarighat Translator: Fatemeh Alimohammadi Daf Structure The Structure of Daf in different cities of Iran has a great variety in terms of dimensions, components and even appearance; some of which are as follows: – Square Daf, on which the skin was stretched either on one or both sides, with strings installed inside it…
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The Structure of Kurdistan Daf (III)

“Our ancestors believe powerful blows upon the Daf scatters evil spirits of disease and distress to create a clean and holy space filled with health and prosperity. Adding tools to Daf increases this instrument’s purification, spreading, and summoning powers of evil forces and goddesses. Daf was mostly depicted by red, color of blood, in ancient times or sometimes it was depicted with green, the color of plants and nature. There were probably some mysterious designs painted upon the wooden body and frames of these instruments just like today” (Pahlavan, 2013: 44).

From Past Days…

The Structure of Kurdistan Daf (II)

With its simple physical structure and captivating sound, the Daf never belonged to a particular culture or location, and every nation had different usages for this instrument considering their dominant customs and traditions.

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Polyphony in Iranian Music (II)

With regard to each polyphonic form, only one specific and distinguished example is analyzed. These polyphonic forms are as follows:

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Amidst the popularity of traditionalism in the Iranian music, Parviz Meshkatian (1955- 2009) moved from Neyshabur to Tehran. He learnt to play Santour and became educated in the Radif of Iranian music at the Centre for Preservation and Promotion of Music which was at the forefront of promoting the return to musical traditions. Despite his studies at a centre which promoted the use of the phrase “traditional music” in Iran, Parviz Meshkatian emerged as a creative artist whose innovative and unique ideas attracted the admiration of Iranian artists and people from different walks of life. This article studies the reason behind Meshkatian’s deviation from the wrong approach of traditionalism strongly promoted by the Centre and argues that apart from the issue of theory of Iranian music, he can be considered as Ali Naqi Vaziri’s successor.

A Note on the Occasion of Houshang Zarif’s Demise

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Principles of Playing Violin (VI)

B. applying force: the force needed for putting finger on finger board is applied through finger tips and using the rest of hand set especially wrist is not allowed. To practice this, it is possible to hold violin without the bow and throw the fingers on the finger board from 1-2cm distance; apply force only through finger tips.

Principles of Playing Violin (V)

3/1/2/5: When the first finger lands next to the nut, continuation of first phalange of this finger, on back of the hand, should be in line with continuation of the back of the wrist and the left hand; moreover, it should not pass them and bend at knuckles. Otherwise, an uncommon stretch is created in first finger’s knuckle also reducing the freedom of other fingers (especially the fourth finger) in finger placement.

Hossein Aslani passed away!

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Parviz Meshkatian’s Heart Beat for People (II)

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Principles of Violin Playing (VII)

4.3.1.3 Regarding the great linear distance and the unusual distance between the first and forth fingers, the first finger while playing the doubles of ninth and tenth interval, can be twisted in the knuckle area and the point mentioned in 3.1.2.5 paragraph in relation to the way first finger is placed indicating that the first joint of this finger in back of hand must be in line with the direction of forearm and left hand is not true here.