Non-profit “Microtona” Project Released

Microtona is a sixty-eight-page booklet with personal comments by the contributing microtonal artists. The booklet also includes a DVD which consists of 8 original video tracks and 9 original audio tracks. The project is an international one featuring unpublished pieces by composers from Iran, Japan, U.S., France, Austria, Germany and Belgium.

In May 2015, Paul A.R. Timmermans selected and invited microtonal musicians from all over the world to contribute to this non-profit project. In his correspondence with potential contributors, Timmermans stated that they are contacted due to their “specific artistic approach… microtonal merits as an innovator (acoustically, digitally, soft), as a composer and/ or as a performer.”
Shaahin Mohajeri, the award-winning Iranian microtonal composer, is also listed as one of the contributors to the project presenting two pieces entitled “Cyrus the Great entered the city of Babylon” and “Tragic parting of the Souls.”

The prominent Iranian microtonal composer describes microtonal music as “A strange and wonderful world of new intervals and musics” which has motivated him to think “microtonally”. He further explains that “These new melodies, harmonies and new musical language are a gift from God to me. I try to test different intervallic models in 96-EDO (equal division of octave) to find their musical characters.”

Mohajeri’s ambition is composing microtonal music for symphony orchestra. Moreover, he is currently working on his “model of time intervals based on the theory of tuning systems” which he calls “Microrythm.”

“Microtona” DVD features the following original audios and videos:

– Hitomi Shimizu: Video Track #1: Meet my 43-tone Organ (2016)
Hitomi Shimizu (organ) & Hiromi Nishida (violin)

– Clarence Barlow: Video Track #2: )ertur( (2015) related to Alphonse Mucha (paintings) / L. Janáček (music)

– Pascale Criton: Video Track #3: Microtonal Limits (2016) & Audio Track #1: Trans (2014) for 2 guitars (Estelle Lallement & Filipe Marquès) Parts: Double + Diagonal
& Audio Track #2: Bothsways (2015) for violin (Silvia Tarozzi) & cello (Deborah Walker)

– Hidekazu Wakabayashi Video Track #4: Iceface tuned Piano in F# (2015)

– Ulf-Diether Soyka: Video Track #5 Intro & Micro-Toccata (2007) & Audio Track #3: Zwischentöne (2009) for clarinet (Slavko Kovacic) und guitar (Zarko Ignjatovic)

– Tolgahan Çoğulu: Audio Track #4: Gelin Savması by İlke Şen (2015) for adjustable microtonal guitar

– Elaine Walker: Video Track #6: My Microtonal Universe 4:42 & Audio Track #5: Sid Song in 10 edo (2015)

Shaahin Mohajeri: Audio Track #6 Cyrus the Great entered the city of Babylon (2015) & Audio Track #7: Tragic parting of the Souls (2015) for virtual orchestral instruments

– Dolores Catherino: Video Track #7: Polychromatic Horizons (2015) 8:13 Polychromatic Impressions (2015)

– Georg Hajdu: Audio Track #8: Just her – Jester – Gesture (2015)

– Paul A.R. Timmermans (P-ART): Video Track #8: Microtonal Jamming (2016) & Audio Track #9: Pluk in 9ET 2:27 / Lined Up in 6ET / Ele in 10ET (2015)

Sources:

– Microtona Booklet
– Paul A.R. Timmermans’ Correspondence with Shaahin Mohajeri

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